“Food & Agri” short film program The Best Short Award goes to “Sushi Japan”

From May 29th, “Food & Agri” online program on SSFF & ASIA’s official website has been streaming 5 short films with the theme of Japanese food and culture. The festival committee has chosen “Sushi Japan” as “Best Short Award” among the five short films, having the most high points in four criteria: “Messages portrayed in the film,” “Attraction of the story,” “Production Quality,” and “Depiction of Japanese food culture”

“Food&Agri” program has been screened online untill June 30th.

Streaming on Web
Food & Agri Program

Five narrative short films depicting images of Japanese food and its culture were chosen among approximately 2400 previously entered short films in Japan Competition, which was established 11 years ago.

“Washoku,” traditional Japanese cuisine, was designated by UNESCO as an Intangible Cultural Heritage In December 2013. In Japan, Washoku has developed as part of daily life and with a connection to annual events” such as New Year’s celebrations and rice planting, and is constantly re-created in response to changes in human relationship with natural and social environment. Washoku also has important social functions for the Japanese to reaffirm identity, to foster familial and community cohesion, and to contribute to healthy life in which Japan must preserve.
In this project, we will use short films as the message tool to promote Japanese food culture to the world, as to attract more fans of Japanese food as well as soliciting exports of Japanese food and culinary products and goods outside of Japan.

more

 Free ticket reservations
Special Passport

Call for entry

Start from August 1st.

Food & Agri

Food & Agri

SUSHI JAPAN

Kenji Tanaka / Japan / 6:58 / Comedy / 2005
Three businessmen are eating sushi at a sushi shop against a background of Red Fuji. A strange man of dignity appears in the shop when they eat sushi very excitedly. There is no talk between them but they are conscious each other. What will happen to the men for sushi?

My Chopsticks

Shun Oi / Japan / 6:58 / Comedy / 2005
My Chopsticks A noodle shop owner wants disposable chopsticks to be used when eating his soba, but his granddaughter wants to use re-usable chopsticks, to help save the Earth. Frustrated by her stubborn grandpa, she runs out of the shop. Seeing his unhappy granddaughter leave, the owner takes action...

Time of the Northern Akita

Kazuhiko Sugimura / Japan / 19:59 / Drama / 2009
A man and a girl return from a big city to their hometown of Odate in Akita. Childhood memories flood the man's mind and he man takes comfort in how his hometown never changes, as well as in nature's gifts and the people he meets. This trilogy takes place in picturesque, northern Akita.

Mother of the Groom

Tsukasa Kishimoto / Okinawa / 19:42 / Drama / 2011
Eiichi, who left home years ago to move to Tokyo, returns to Okinawa to report his engagement. But his mother and grandmother, who won’t acknowledge Shiori, eventually offer their blessing on one condition - she must help out with Ukui, a traditional Okinawan event, something she knows nothing about.

Another Tea?

Yo Kohatsu / Japan / 8:25 / Comedy / 2009
A grandmother with burns on her hands teaches her novice granddaughter the tea ceremony. How hospitable can they be to the foreign VIPs? Directed by Yo Kohatsu, who made his directorial debut with photographer R. Kirishima in "Raise the Castle!," which received critical acclaim.

  • SUSHI JAPAN

  • My Chopsticks

  • Time of the Northern Akita

  • Mother of the Groom

  • Another Tea?

Tsuki-mi dango (dumplings offered to the moon)

Said to be a tradition from the Heian period, "tsuki-mi"(moon watching) is a rite to celebrate one’s harvest under the moon, a symbol of good crops. Originally, offerings of various potato and bean varieties we made, but later dumplings made from rice began to make an appearance.
It is said that the reason dumplings are round is so that they resemble the moon.

Toshi koshi soba (soba noodles eaten on New Year's Eve)

The custom of eating soba on the eve of New Year is said to have been established in the Edo period. As soba is easier to slice than other types of noodles, it has is imbued with the hope that "all misfortunes for the coming year will be cut away."

Ehomaki (large cylindrical sushi roll)

In addition to the popular ritual of scattering dried soy beans to ward off evil spirits on Setsubun (the last day of winter, the day before spring), the eating of ehomaki is a tradition practiced primarily in Osaka prefecture. The ehomaki is eaten whole whilst facing towards the lucky direction (the "eho") for that year and a silent prayer of said.

O-zoni (soup cooked with rice cakes and vegetables)

A celebratory meal incorporating mochi (rice cakes), this soup is traditionally eaten at New Year's in all parts of Japanese except Okinawa. The ingredients are selected according to locally produced specialties, and the flavoring can differ from region to region, with the Kansai region using white miso, and Western Japan preferring a clear soup.

O-sechi (boxed food served over New Year)

Partly an abbreviation of the word "sekku," which refers to the seasonal festivals held in the Imperial Court during the Heian period, it describes celebratory cuisine to be eaten on the occasion of New Year.
While each of the dishes included in o-sechi has its own symbolic meaning and significance, the combined whole is distinguished by its arrangement in a multi-tiered meal box. The dishes included may be preserved and eaten over a few days, because it is believed that when the gods are being welcomed over New Year, the kitchen should not be disturbed.

DANGO

Toji no kabocha (winter solstice pumpkin)

During the winter solstice, it is said to be good luck to eat foods whose names include the character pronounced "n," as it is phonetically similar to the Japanese word for luck, "un." Pumpkins, a popular ingredient,are sometimes known as "nankin." Abundant in Vitamin A and carotenes, they are also said to help ward off colds and palsy (cerebrovascular disease).

Doyo no ushi no hi (day of the ox in midsummer)

A tradition that took hold in the mid-to-late late Edo period, when unagi (Japanese eel) had been eaten to ward off fatigue caused by summer heat. At the point unagi restaurateurs became no longer able to sell their unagi during the summer season, they began posting signs outside their shops declaring "today is day of the xo,” following the advice of the influential Edo period scholar Gennai Hiraga. As a result they once againenjoyed roaring business, and so this story spread as an anecdotal tale.

Nanakusa gayu (rice porridge with seven kinds of spring herbs)

Using the seven spring herbs as the main ingredients (seri (Japanese parsley), nazuna (shepherd's purse), gogyo (Jersey cudweed), hakobera (chickweed), hotokenoza (henbit), suzuna (turnip), suzushiro(radish)), this is a porridge that is eaten on the morning of January 7. Beckoning sound health for the forthcoming year, it is also said to be good for soothing stomachs fatigued from the celebratory eating and drinking of New Year.

Five narrative short films depicting images of Japanese food and its culture were chosen among
approximately 2400 previously entered short films in Japan Competition, which was established 11 years ago.

“Washoku,” traditional Japanese cuisine, was designated by UNESCO as an Intangible Cultural Heritage In December 2013. In Japan, Washoku has developed as part of daily life and with a connection to annual events” such as New Year’s celebrations and rice planting, and is constantly re-created in response to changes in human relationship with natural and social environment. Washoku also has important social functions for the Japanese to reaffirm identity, to foster familial and community cohesion, and to contribute to healthy life in which Japan must preserve.
In this project, we will use short films as the message tool to promote Japanese food culture to the world, as to attract more fans of Japanese food as well as soliciting exports of Japanese food and culinary products and goods outside of Japan.

HOME » en » Food & Agri

MENU

Copyright © Short Shorts Film Festival & Asia 2014.

Go to the Top